Skip to main content
Skip to main content

Connect with the College

Professional Work in a 'Post-Racial' Era: Black Health Care Workers in the New Economy

March 1, 2019, 2:30-3:30 pm
Broad Auditorium, Claude Pepper Center, 636 W. Call Street

The Department of Sociology and African-American Studies program present a colloquium featuring Dr. Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of sociology at Washington University in St. Louis and president of Sociologists for Women in Society.

Wingfield will discuss her study exploring how economic and organizational changes to work specifically impact black professionals.

One major recent change is that many organizations now state their commitment to and interest in creating a more diverse workforce, yet research shows they rarely do this in ways that tangibly change the numbers of women of all races and minority men at the top levels of organizations.

Wingfield's project investigates the consequences of this paradox for black professionals in high status occupations. Though the research focuses specifically on the health care industry, findings have broad implications for black workers in a variety of professional occupations, as many other industries wrestle with this stated desire for more diversity even while they shed the organizational resources that would enable this to occur.

This presentation seeks to help shed light on how this happens in health care and how this could apply to black professionals in other fields who encounter similar organizational processes.

Wingfield is the author of several books, including "No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men’s Work," which received the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association Race, Gender, and Class Section. She has also written numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals including Social Problems, Gender & Society and Ethnic and Racial Studies. She has lectured internationally on her research.

The talk will be followed by a reception in the Pepper Center lobby.

The colloquium is co-sponsored by the Council on Diversity and Inclusion in the College of Medicine.