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Department of Political Science

College of Social Sciences and Public Policy

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Job Candidates

The following FSU graduate students are currently seeking academic positions:

AMERICAN POLITICS

Alexandra G. Cockerham (Ph.D. expected Spring 2017)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Alexandra Cockerham's research interests center on executive power, with an eye toward the limitations that institutions impose on directly elected executives. Elected by either national or state wide constituencies, public expectations of presidents and governors often exceed what formal powers would alone permit, and the formal separation of legislative power often frustrates executives policy agendas. Though most extant research focuses on a single national-level context, limiting our understanding of how variable institutional arrangements shape executive power, her research is explicitly comparative in nature, focusing on both the US states and presidential democracies.

Dissertation Committee: Bob Crew (Chair), Amanda Driscoll, and Carol Weissert.

Kevin Fahey(Ph.D. expected Spring 2017)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Kevin Fahey’s research focuses on legislative behavior. His three-essay dissertation examines how institutions shape legislative incentives. His first essay theorizes the conditions under which candidates for office prioritize their personal incentives over those of their constituents. Using a regression-discontinuity design on a dataset of 84,000 state legislative elections, he finds evidence that reforms to curb careerism actually contributed to lawmakers pursuing personal goals. His second essay explores these personal incentives with a theory of legislative financial gains as a purposive goal, using an original dataset of financial disclosures forms for members of the Florida House of Representatives. This essay offers an empirical test of the political determinants of returns to office, and finds that electoral safety results in higher income growth for legislators. This essay is under review. His third essay explores the implications of financial gain as a legislative goal, providing a theoretical framework to explain how income accumulation contributes to shirking behavior in the legislature. Kevin has a side project under review that analyzes how competence and personal biases influence performance evaluations of members of the U.S. Cabinet. Other side projects study the role of media endorsements in low-salience ballot initiatives, and the dynamics of agenda-setting in state legislatures. Kevin has taught undergraduate courses in American Government and State Politics, and was the T.A. for the graduate-level course on Causal Inference.

Dissertation Committee: Carol Weissert (Chair), Robert Jackson, Quintin Beazer, and Patrick Merle (Communications).

Jonathan Rogers (Ph.D., 2013)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Jonathan Rogers is an instructor of political science at New York University Abu Dhabi.  His research focuses on voting behavior, policy change, and the nastier side of other-regarding behavior: discrimination, cheating, spite, and frustration.  In one current project, Jon studies how voters respond to rule changes.  He argues that controversial laws appear to have little immediate effect on turnout, because there are two competing effects.  Some votes are suppressed, but other citizens are angered enough by the rule change to mobilize and vote.  Only in the long term do rule changes depress turnout.  The longer that a rule has been in place, the more legitimate it is seen, and so the mobilizing anger abates.  Jon's published work appears in Electoral Studies, Political Science Research and Methods, Economic Inquiry, and other outlets.  In the classroom, he has considerable experience teaching a variety of research methods at all levels, as well as introductory courses in political science and public policy.

Dissertation Committee: Jens Grosser (co-chair), John Scholz (co-chair), Eric Coleman, Mark Isaac, John Ryan.

Alex Severson (Ph.D. expected Spring 2017)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Alexander (Alex) Severson’s research interests contribute to a deeper understanding of the psychology of social status, redistributive preferences, income inequality, and partisan identification. His dissertation research uses survey data from the 2012 ANES, panel data from the U.S. states, and a series of laboratory experiments to explore how psychological factors—threat perceptions and blame attributions—and institutional factors—transparency and accountability initiatives—influence the redistributive preferences of individuals and the redistributive behavior of states. In addition to his dissertation research, Severson is currently working on a series of survey experiments that assess the predictive power of a novel measure of partisan identification—partisan fusion. Severson has taught undergraduate courses in Public Opinion and Electoral Behavior, Political Psychology, Public Policy, and Policy Evaluation and has been a teaching assistant for undergraduate and graduate-level classes in Research Methods. His published work on moral frames and attitudes toward climate change policy has appeared in the journal Social Science Quarterly.

Dissertation Committee: Eric A. Coleman (Chair), Brad Gomez, Jens Grosser, Mark Isaac (Economics).

COMPARATIVE POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Casey Delehanty (Ph.D. 2016)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Casey Delehanty's research interests fall within the emerging field of Political Violence. Specifically, Casey studies the violent interactions between dissident groups, governments, pro-government militias and civilians, with an interest towards country-level civil conflict dynamics. Casey is also strongly committed to undergraduate instruction, having been awarded the Graduate Student Teacher of the Year award in 2014 and 2015 from the Political Science Department. His teaching interests span International Relations and Comparative politics. He has taught an Introduction to International Relations course as well as multiple iterations of Latin American Politics and Political Violence. He is also prepared to teach courses on Research Methods, Comparative Politics, and Human Rights, among others.

Dissertation Committee: Will H. Moore (Arizona State University, Co-Chair), Sean Ehrlich (Co-Chair) Amanda Driscoll, Mark Souva, Megan Shannon (University of Colorado), and Robinson Herrera (FSU History).

Xiaoli Guo(Ph.D. expected 2016)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Xiaoli Guo’s research interests fall within the fields of international relations and comparative politics. Specifically, she employs game—theoretical models and experiments to study collective action, political violence, identity formation, and governance in authoritarian societies, mainly China. Her dissertation consists of three essays on violent conflict. The first essay applies a game-theoretical model to examine how the international community could exploit endogenous military power of the combatants to achieve efficient and effective sanction in inter- and intra-state conflict. The second essay uses game-theoretical models and lab experiments to explore the effect of an endowment in dispute on the disputant's demand in crisis bargaining, and the likelihood of bargaining failure and conflict. The findings reveal that a disputant refers to an endowment mostly out of a strategic motivation to land on a favorable agreement, rather than biases such as loss aversion. It also identifies the conditions to reduce conflict when an endowment does exist in dispute. The third essay as a continuation of the second one further teases out the interactive effect of an endowment and the bargaining protocol in crisis bargaining--whether one's strategic behavior regarding an endowment and the conflict rate could be reduced by a bargaining protocol that enables the disputant to reveal more information and facilitates coordination. She has several other ongoing projects.

Dissertation Committee: Jens Grosser (Chair), Will Moore (Arizona State University), David Siegel (Duke University), Mark Souva, and David Cooper (FSU Economics).

M. Scott Meachum (Ph.D. 2016)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Scott Meachum's primary research field is international relations, with specific interests in international law, international organizations, and American foreign policy. He is interested and seeks to explain the role that international law plays in international politics, both in terms of how the law affects the behavior of actors and how those same actors influence the growth of international law. His dissertation, “Who Recognizes? The Politics of Legitimizing Governments after Extra-Legal Change,” examines the understudied topic of recognition of new governments with a particular focus on new governments that come to power through irregular and extra-legal means. His work offers the first empirical test of the political determinants of third-party governments’ decisions to recognize. Related to his primary field, Scott has taught Introduction to International Relations as well as International Organization, and his teaching interests extend to his secondary field of American Politics. With a J.D. and a legal background he has taught two constitutional law classes. The Supreme Court in American politics focuses on the institutions of government created by the Constitution and the powers granted to them, while Civil Rights and Civil Liberties addresses individual rights and liberties granted citizens under the Constitution.  Dr. Meachum currently serves as the Assistant Director of the Global and Public Affairs Learning Community at FSU.

Dissertation Committee: Will Moore (Arizona State University, Co-Chair), Sean Ehrlich (Co-Chair), Mark Souva, Megan Shannon (University of Colorado), and Michael Creswell (FSU History).

Ammar Shamaileh (Ph.D., 2015)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Ammar is currently serving a term appointment as Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville. He recently received his Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at Florida State University after defending his dissertation entitled “Beyond Bouazizi: Culture, Terror and Gender Equality in the Arab World.” While his research interests stretch broadly, his current research agenda focuses primarily on the relationship between informal institutions or cultural phenomena and political behavior and violence in the Middle East. His book manuscript is under contract with Routledge, and explores the relationship between interpersonal trust and violent protest, and how differences in interpersonal trust dynamics may, in part, explain the divergent turns that the Arab Spring uprisings took in Egypt, Libya and Syria. He has taught a broad range of courses, including international public law, Middle East politics, comparative politics and Political Violence, and is looking forward to teaching courses on research methods, international relations, and comparative political economy during the 2016-2017 academic year.

Dissertation Committee: Jens Grosser (Chair), Mark Souva, Eric Coleman, David Siegel (Duke University) and Dmitry Ryvkin (FSU Economics).

Ryan Welch (Ph.D. 2016)
Curriculum Vitae
Website

Ryan Welch's research interests intersect International Relations and Comparative Politics. He studies human rights/political violence and international organization/governance. His dissertation explored a specific type of domestic institution, National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). NHRIs are domestic institutions established by the government to promote and protect peoples' human rights in that state. Using original data, the project answered three questions – (1) Given international commitments, can NHRIs constrain state behavior (forthcoming in Journal of Human Rights)? (2) Why do states (not) adopt NHRIs? (3) Given a state adopts an NHRI, how is the NHRI designed? He continues to expand the dissertation in two separate projects exploring (1) the independent effects of NHRIs and (2) how NHRIs effect state compliance with regional courts.  Research on NHRIs led him to the two research agendas of political violence and international governance.  His current political violence projects include a review essay titled “Why Do Governments Abuse Human Rights” (published in the edited Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences”), the effects of religion on rebel group violence, and the effects of militarization policies on police violence.  Current international governance projects include a project on the effects of international organization membership on human rights behavior and a data collection project on the International Court of Justice.  He has taught undergraduate International Law, Methods, and Comparative Politics. He was Teaching Assistant for graduate Maximum Likelihood and Introduction to Game Theory.

Dissertation Committee: Will H. Moore (Chair), Quintin Beazer, Christopher Reenock, Megan Shannon, Sumner Twiss (FSU Religion)